Number Of Valence Electrons In Aluminum

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There are 3 valence electrons in the atom of aluminum. Number of valence electrons depends on number of electrons in uncharged atom (= atomic number), not on mass. Chat Now Send Inquiry How many valence electrons does aluminum have?. Aluminum number of valence electrons. If you have any questions or good suggestions on our products and site, or if you want to know more information about our products, please write them and send to us, we will contact you within one business day. .For atoms with LESS than 4valence electrons, they’re going to lose/give upelectrons to form positive cations.For atoms with MORE than 4valence electrons, they’re going to gain/stealelectrons to form negative anions.For atoms with 4 valence electrons, it can go either way.For atoms with 8 valence electrons, there is no change.

The number of dots you have around the Lewis electron-dot symbols of elements represents the actual number of valence electrons for the element.

Elements belonging to Group VIIIA are called the noble gases. These elements have 8 valence electrons and are said to have a complete octet of electrons. This is the equivalent of a filled energy level, or a closed shell. This special arrangement of EIGHT electrons makes the noble gases relatively unreactive. Although Helium is the only noble gas with two valence electrons, you will recall that the first energy level can only accommodate two electrons.

Aluminum Valence Shell

A thorough understanding of the Rule of Eight or the Octet Rule is essential for further study involving chemical bonding of atoms and the formation of compounds. It turns out that in the formation of molecules from atoms, most atoms attempt to achieve this configuration of 8 valence electrons around each atom. In order to achieve this, atoms tend to lose or gain electrons to ions in order to achieve an octet of electrons.

Ion formation

GroupNumber of valence electronsGain or lose electronsCharge of ionsExamples
IA1lose 1 electron+1H+, Li+, Na+, K+
IIA2lose 2 electrons+2Mg+2, Ca+2, Sr+2
IIIA3lose 3 electrons+3Al+3, Ga+3
IVA4lose 4 electrons
gain 4 electrons
+4
-4
Sn+4, Pb+4
C-4
VA5gain 3 electrons-3N-3, P-3
VIA6gain 2 electrons-2O-2, S-2
VIIA7gain 1 electron-1F-, Cl-
VIIIA8Complete octet makes the noble gases unreactive

Number of bonds

The location of an element in the periodic table allows us to predict the number of covalent bonds that it can form. When an element forms a bond with another element, a line is drawn to represent the sharing of a pair of electrons between the two elements.

  • Hydrogen belonging to Group IA has one valence electron, shares this valence electron with another atom to form one covalent bond.
Electron - Dot SymbolCovalent BondingNumber of Covalent Bond
1
  • Boron belonging to Group IIIA has three valence electrons, shares its valence electrons with other atoms to form three covalent bonds.
Electron - Dot SymbolCovalent BondingNumber of Covalent Bond
3
  • Carbon and Silicon belonging to Group IVA have four valence electrons, shares their valence electrons with other atoms to form four covalent bonds.
Electron - Dot SymbolCovalent BondingNumber of Covalent Bond
4
4
  • Nitrogen and Phosphorus belonging to Group VA has five valence electrons, shares three of its five valence electrons with other atoms to form three covalent bonds. The other two valence electrons form one nonbonding electron pair.
Electron - Dot SymbolCovalent BondingNumber of Covalent Bond
3
3
  • Oxygen and Sulfur belonging to Group VIA has six valence electrons. These elements need two valence electrons to complete an octet of electrons. They share two of the six valence electrons with other atoms to form two covalent bonds. The other four valence electrons form two nonbonding electron pair.
Aluminium valence electron
Electron - Dot SymbolCovalent BondingNumber of Covalent Bond
2
2
  • Fluorine, Chlorine, Bromine and Iodine belonging to Group VIIA has seven valence electrons. These elements need one valence electron to complete an octet of electrons. They share one of the seven valence electrons with other atoms to form one covalent bond. The other six valence electrons form three nonbonding electron pair.
Electron - Dot SymbolCovalent BondingNumber of Covalent Bond
1
1
1
1

Exceptions to the Octet Rule

There are exceptions to the Octet rule for atoms below period two.

  • Boron and aluminum compounds commonly have six electrons around the metal center (eg AlH3, BH3). Compounds with less than an octet around each atom are called electron deficient. Part of this is due to their low electronegativity properties.
  • Phosphorus and Sulfur have a tendency to exceed their octets (eg PF5, SF6). Phosphorus and sulfur expand their octets to accommodate more than eight electrons because they have empty 3d orbitals.

The Octet Rule is a simplistic view on the concept of bonding. Molecular Orbital Theory provides a better description of the complexity of molecular bonding.


Content suitability

BCIT courses:CHEM 0011

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Number Of Valence Electrons In Aluminum Ion

Initially, the aluminum atom had a charge of +13 + (−13) = 0; in other words, its charge was neutral due to the equal numbers of protons and electrons. When it becomes an ion, it loses 3 electrons, leaving behind only 10. Now the charge is +13 + (−10) = +3.

Number Of Valence Electrons In Aluminium Oxide

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People also ask, does aluminum want to gain or lose electrons?

Aluminum is a metal that will always lose three electrons. The halogens all have seven valence electrons. Each one of these elements wants to gain one electron to achieve an octet. Metals will always lose electrons to form cations.

Subsequently, question is, why does aluminum form a 3+ ion? Aluminum, a member of the IIIA family, loses three electrons to form a 3+ cation. The halogens (VIIA elements) all have seven valence electrons. All the halogens gain a single electron to fill their valence energy level. And all of them form an anion with a single negative charge.

One may also ask, how many electrons does aluminum need to gain or lose to become stable?

3 electrons

How many electrons are in a aluminum ion?

The charge of an aluminum ion is typically 3+. This is because the element's atomic number is 13, reflecting the fact that it has 13 electrons and 13 protons. The valence shell of aluminum has three electrons, and per the octet rule, these three electrons are lost resulting in just 10 electrons and 13 protons.