Homebrew Bash

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Great Nebraska Brew Bash, Springfield, Nebraska. 7,185 likes 1 talking about this 1,643 were here. Great Nebraska Brew Bash is a regional beer fest, drawing in never-before-seen brewers. Homebrew comes with completion definitions for the brew command. Some packages also provide completion definitions for their own programs. Zsh, bash and fish are currently supported. You must then configure your shell to enable its completion support.

Homebrew comes with completion definitions for the brew command. Some packages also provide completion definitions for their own programs.

zsh, bash and fish are currently supported.

You must then configure your shell to enable its completion support. This is because the Homebrew-managed completions are stored under HOMEBREW_PREFIX which your system shell may not be aware of, and since it is difficult to automatically configure bash and zsh completions in a robust manner, the Homebrew installer does not do it for you.

Shell completions for external Homebrew commands are not automatically installed. To opt-in to using completions for external commands (if provided), they need to be linked to HOMEBREW_PREFIX by running brew completions link.

Configuring Completions in bash

To make Homebrew’s completions available in bash, you must source the definitions as part of your shell’s startup. Add the following to your ~/.bash_profile (or, if it doesn’t exist, ~/.profile):

If you install the bash-completion formula, this will automatically source the completions’ initialisation script (so you do not need to follow the instructions in the caveats).

If you are using the bash formula as your shell (i.e. bash >= v4) you should use the [email protected] formula instead.

Configuring Completions in zsh

To make Homebrew’s completions available in zsh, you must get the Homebrew-managed zsh site-functions on your FPATH before initialising zsh’s completion facility. Add the following to your ~/.zshrc file:

This must be done before compinit is called. Note that if you are using Oh My Zsh, it will call compinit for you, so this must be done before you call oh-my-zsh.sh. This may be done by appending the following line to your ~/.zprofile after Homebrew’s initialization, instead of modifying your ~/.zshrc as above:

You may also need to forcibly rebuild zcompdump:

Additionally, if you receive “zsh compinit: insecure directories” warnings when attempting to load these completions, you may need to run this:

Mac Brew Install

Configuring Completions in fish

No configuration is needed if you’re using Homebrew’s fish. Friendly!

If your fish is from somewhere else, add the following to your ~/.config/fish/config.fish:

This post is out of date and has been archived. Don’t say I didn’t warnyou!

If you haven’t manually updated your version of Bash or Zsh on OS X, chances are it’s out-of-date. Here’s how to install the latest version and keep your shell updated using Homebrew.

OS X ships with an outdated version of Bash as its default shell. The preinstalled version dates back to 2007, and since then, Bash has been updated to add features and fix troublesome bugs. If you want to use an updated version of Bash—or even Zsh—as your shell, you can install it by using Homebrew, a package manager for OS X.

Installing via Homebrew

To get things started, you need to tell Homebrew to install the latest version of your shell. Whether you prefer using Bash or Zsh, the following instructions will work for both. Just change the word bash to zsh, and you’ll be good to go.

Homebrew bash free

Open your terminal and enter this command:

Homebrew Bash-git-prompt

Homebrew installs packages to /usr/local/bin/, so you’ll need to specify that path when looking for any Homebrew packages. In the following three commands, we’ll initiate a shell as the root user, append our desired shell’s path to a file of whitelisted system shells, and then change the system shell globally.

Example

Now you can close and reopen your terminal. With just those few commands, you should be using with the latest version of your shell. You can double-check the version you’re using with the command echo $BASH_VERSION. Or, if you’ve installed Zsh, you can use the command echo $ZSH_VERSION to do the same.

That’s it for installing your brand-new shell. Let’s take a look at how to keep it up-to-date with the help of Homebrew.

Staying current

Homebrew Bash Completion Not Working

The Homebrew command update actually refers to updating Homebrew itself. If you want to install the latest version of a Homebrew package, you’ll have to use the word upgrade instead:

In this example, Homebrew will look for the package named bash on your computer and install the latest version. If you already have the newest version installed, Homebrew will print an error message telling you exactly that. You’ll have to run this command manually from time to time, but it’s a much more reliable approach than downloading directly from source or maintaining a cloned version control repository.

Now go out and write shell scripts for all the things.