Citrix Workspace Add In

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During the last couple of weeks I have been helping customers implement Microsoft Teams in their Citrix VAD setups. A common denominator for most of the Teams implementations was Teams consuming a lot of resources, different Teams versions were present in the environment and Teams generating a huge amount of temporary or cached data in the user’s profile.

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In this article I’ll share my experiences with Teams in Citrix VAD. This is by no means a best-practices install or configuration guide it’s more of a guide on how to avoid a couple of different pitfalls and hopefully also provide a great user experience with Teams in a Citrix VAD setup.

Citrix Workspace Add In

Citrix Workspace app for Windows is an easy-to-install app that provides access to your applications and desktops using Citrix Virtual Apps and Desktops from a remote client device. Citrix Workspace app provides access from your desktop, Start menu, Citrix Workspace user interface, or web browsers. Get to know Citrix Workspace and how to access and share everything you need. Discover how to gain secure access, improve content collaboration and share work anywhere. How to use Citrix Workspace Chrome Extension. After installation, click on Launch or visit chrome://apps from Google Chrome Browser. Click on the Citrix Workspace App. Now, type the URL of your Organization’s Citrix login. And you should be all set. The keyboard binding should work when you logged in to the virtual machine. Windows Citrix Workspace Setup Using Internet Explorer (If using Windows 7 skip to the next page. If using Windows 10 continue from here.) Now open up Microsoft Edge either with the link on your desktop Or from the start menu In order to access Citrix from home, Ballad Health, or anywhere outside of the clinics.

Add

If you are not familiar with Microsoft Teams, you might want to gather some information before installing or configuring anything with Teams in a Citrix VAD setup. Visit this site, if you want to know more about Microsoft Teams.

Add the CitrixBase.admx/CitrixBase.adml to the PolicyDefinitions folder to view the template files in Administrative Templates Citrix Components Citrix Workspace.

First of all I want us to be on common ground before going any further with this article, so we’ll have to cover the different ways of installing Microsoft Teams, as this is an area causing a bit of confusion. In this article I am using the 64-bit version of Teams and the 64-bit version of Office installed in Windows Server 2019 with using FSLogix Profile Container.

Installing Microsoft Teams Per-User:

Today there are 2 different ways of installing Microsoft Teams. You can install it either as a per-user install or a per-machine (machine-wide) install. Microsoft recommends to install Teams as a per-machine install in non-persistent setups.

The per-user install can be installed in a few different ways. Either via the Office 365 click-to-run installer, via an EXE file or via an MSI file, Microsoft isn’t making this easy! Both the EXE installer and MSI installer can be downloaded in either 32-bit or 64-bit, make sure to get to one matching the Windows architecture.

You can get the EXE file here:
https://products.office.com/en-us/microsoft-teams/download-app
You can get the MSI files here:
32-bit – https://teams.microsoft.com/downloads/desktopurl?env=production&plat=windows&managedInstaller=true&download=true
64-bit – https://teams.microsoft.com/downloads/desktopurl?env=production&plat=windows&arch=x64&managedInstaller=true&download=true

So, as you can there are 3 different ways of deploying Microsoft Teams as a per-user install, a bit of a mess if you ask me and I am not surprised if some finds it a bit confusing.

We’ll need to dive a bit deeper in how the per-user install actually works, even though it’s not the recommended way of deploying Microsoft Teams, there is some useful information for when we cover the migration from the per-user install to a per-machine later in this article.

Both the EXE file, MSI file and the Office 365 click-to-run “installs” a Teams.exe file and a setup.json file in C:Program Files (x86)Teams Installer:

In this case I have installed version 1.3.0.4461 of Teams:

The Teams.exe file is the actual installer, which installs Microsoft Teams in AppDataLocalMicrosoft the user’s profile. The installation is triggered by Teams.exe process via registry, which can be found here:

For copy/pasting:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREWOW6432NodeMicrosoftWindowsCurrentVersionRun

So a plain old registry value in Run is used to kick off Teams, not necessarily the best way to start an app in a non-persistent shared environment, but then again this is the per-user install of Teams, which is meant to be installed on a physical Windows 10 machine, not a shared environment.

As mentioned, during logon Teams is installed in the user’s profile and when Teams is started up and the user has logged on, this is how the Teams install folder looks like:

Citrix Workspace Add In

Once this is completed, the Update.exe process, now in the user’s profile, is used to start Teams. This is, again, done via registry:

For copy/pasting:
HKEY_CURRENT_USERSoftwareMicrosoftWindowsCurrentVersionRun

As you can see the Update.exe is executed with a few parameters. I have not been able to find any information as to why this procedure is used to start Teams in a per-user install. My guess is that this Update.exe process checks for any new releases of Teams during startup of Teams, and then downloads the latest version at some point.

Microsoft has a very short article about the update process here:
https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/microsoftteams/teams-client-update

According to the article Teams is updated every two weeks, no specific time of day is mentioned, so we’ll have to assume that the update process just kicks in at random. I have had a Teams running in a session for a couple of hours, no update kicked in. I have tried to log on and log off several times with Teams auto launching, nothing. At a customer I have seen 3 different versions of Teams being used at the same time, by different users. This might complicate things a bit in terms of troubleshooting because of the different versions. Some users might have issues that other users don’t have because they user another version of Teams.

For the sake of this article, I have done a manuel update via the “Check for Updates” feature:

This kicks off the update process, where the Teams.exe process and the Updates.exe process both consume a considerable amount of CPU resources, both processes have the priority of “normal” in Windows, which means that it might slow any other applications down for a couple of minutes, especially if you have multiple users where this update kicks in at the same time.

The update process goes out to Microsoft and downloads the latest version of Teams to the AppDataLocalMicrosoftTeamsstage folder in the user’s profile:

Once the source files for the new version of Teams are downloaded, the user will get a notification about a new version being available:

If the user clicks the “Please refresh now” text box, the updater kicks in and is again consuming a considerable amount of CPU resources, still at “normal” process priority, which may once again potentially slow other apps down for a period of time.
Interesting stuff is also going on in the user’s profile. The “stage” folder is now removed, and replaced with a “previous” folder:

So the user now has two versions of Teams in the profile, the current updated version, which is installed in the “current” folder and is the one being actively used in the current folder, and then the previous version of Teams, which is no longer used, essentially now doubling the amount of space used for the Teams install. Considering that I have found no information of how a user might be able to revert to a previous version of Teams, there is nothing in the Teams app that enables the user to roll back to a previously used Teams version, I am having a difficult time understanding why it’s necessary to store the previous version in the user’s profile, why isn’t just deleted?

To wrap this section up, there really isn’t any reason to use a Teams per-user install in a shared environment. In a shared environment we should have a degree of control of the apps installed and update process of the apps, to ensure stability and functionality. With a Teams per-user install, we don’t have any control, from the moment it’s installed it’s out of our control, because we don’t control the update process.

Migrate Teams per-user to Teams per-machine

Now you have come this far and you might have realized that Teams isn’t installed in the correct and recommended way, you can go a few different ways. Leave it be, and hope that Microsoft doesn’t change anything major or add additional features, which might demand even more resources or maybe break existing functionality. Or remove the current Teams per-user install and deploy the Teams per-machine install instead, which is also the recommendation from Microsoft.

If you decide to leave Teams alone in it’s current state, then there is no reason for you to read any further. However if you want to deploy the Teams per-machine instead, then stay with me.

To be honest this isn’t really a migration, it’s really “just” an uninstall of Teams, and an install of Teams suited for non-persistent shared environments.

Workspace

Switching to a Teams per-machine install is fairly easy, you are probably not expecting that, considering we have to go out to every single user profile and remove a Teams per-user install, but Microsoft has actually done some clever thinking, when it comes to removing Teams per-user.

Uninstall Teams per-user

The first thing we’ll need to do is to remove the Teams per-user install. In Windows Server 2019 we’ll go to Apps and Features select the “Teams Machine-wide installer” and click uninstall. In this case the name is not entirely accurate, or it is, but the “Teams Machine-wide installer” is the machine-wide, or the per-machine installer, but it can also do a Teams per-user install. You might see “Teams” or “Teams Installer” instead, this is because you have used the EXE installer, mentioned earlier.

Back on track. The uninstall should be pretty uneventful, it’s an uninstall like any other uninstall, other than this uninstall only removes the C:Program Files (x86)Teams Installer folder, and not the Teams installed in the user’s profile. So, how to remove Teams from the users profiles? This is where Microsoft has done some clever thinking. During the uninstall of Teams per-user, two registry values are created here:

For copy/pasting:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREWOW6432NodeMicrosoftWindowsCurrentVersionRun

We need the data in the value “TeamsMachineUninstallerLocalAppData”, this string will uninstall Teams per-user, in the user’s profile.
For copy/pasting:
%LOCALAPPDATA%MicrosoftTeamsUpdate.exe –uninstall –msiUninstall –source=default

You HAVE to use this uninstall string, it is not enough to just delete the Teams folder from the user’s profile, Teams will come back if you do and you could end up with a mix of Teams per-user and Teams per-machine, they are able to exist perfectly fine side by side, you don’t want that!.
If you leave both values where they are, Teams will be uninstall during the next logon. In some cases that might be OK, however if you want a more controlled process, let’s say you want to do the uninstall for a specific group of users or when user’s access a test-server, you can bring in something like Citrix Workspace Environment Management, to execute the uninstall string based on AD group membership or anything that would identify the server as a test-server or whether the Teams install is a per-user or per-machine.

If you are going with the WEM approach make sure that both the “TeamsMachineUninstallerLocalAppData” and “TeamsMachineUninstallerProgramData” values are deleted, before going any further.

In WEM we can use an external task to execute the uninstall string:

Instead of using an AD group membership as a filter for the Teams per-user uninstall, we can use a combination of two filter conditions doing File/Folder matches, making sure that Teams per-user is not uninstalled, unless there is a Teams per-machine installed on the Session Host/VDI. We will have to create a filter condition which is checking to see if “%LOCALAPPDATA%MicrosoftTeamscurrentTeams.exe” exists and another filter condition which is checking to see if “C:Program Files (x86)MicrosoftTeamscurrentTeams.exe” exists. The “C:Program Files (x86)MicrosoftTeams” folder is where the Teams per-machine is installed, we’ll cover that in a moment.

The filter conditions look like this:

With these conditions I can create a filter rule which can be assigned to the “Teams per-user uninstall” external task.

The filter rule looks like this:

For this filter rule to apply, both filter conditions have to me met.

The last thing we need is to assign the “Teams per-user uninstall” external task:

Go to Assignments and click the little arrow button

In the drop down box select the filter rule we just created

You should end up with an assignment looking like this.

To summarize – Via WEM we are now uninstalling Teams per-user if the user is logging on to a Session Host/VDI that has Teams per-machine installed and Teams per-user exists in the user’s profile. We now have a controlled way of getting rid of Teams per-user.

Install Teams per-machine (Machine-wide)

There are a lot of different articles and guides on how to install Teams in a non-persistent and/or shared environment, I recommend this article by fellow CTA Manuel Winkel:
https://www.deyda.net/index.php/en/2020/02/25/install-teams-onedrive-in-citrix-machine-based/

Going further, I am assuming that you are going with the WEM approach, if you are not there might be some slight differences in how Teams behaves.

Also be aware that Microsoft is not making things easy for us at the moment. Currently there are two different download links for the Teams per-machine MSI installer, make sure to get the version from the link i Manuels article, as this is the version currently supported by Citrix (CTX253754). Make sure to keep an eye on that CTX253754 article.

The most important thing to remember is to user the correct install parameters during setup, to make sure that Teams is deployed as a per-machine install. Either go to the article by Manuel, refer to the official “Teams for Virtualized Desktop Infrastructure” documentation or use this command:
msiexec /i Teams_windows_x64.msi ALLUSER=1 ALLUSERS=1

To verify that it is a Teams per-machine install, make sure that you have a “C:Program Files (x86)MicrosoftTeams” folder. The folder structure in here should look familiar to you:

Teams is launched from the “current” folder via the Teams.exe process and once again a registry value is used to do the launch.
The registry value can be found here:

For copy/pasting:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREWOW6432NodeMicrosoftWindowsCurrentVersionRun

Personally I delete this registry value, because I don’t want Teams auto starting via registry. There might be situations where you want to have a bit more control over who is running Teams, maybe because of license enforce ment or maybe you are testing Teams, and only want a certain group of users to be able to access Teams. Or perhaps you just don’t want applications auto launching during logon.

To control the Teams startup, we’ll again turn to Citrix WEM. Create an action, in this case it’s just called “Teams”:

Assign the newly created Teams action:

In this case I have created filter rule with a filter condition with an AD group membership check, so my user will have to be a member of a specific AD group for the action to apply.

Configure Teams for automatic start up:

Make sure Auto Start has a green check mark.

This is it! Teams per-machine is now alive and kicking.

Profile Exclusions

Both Teams per-user and Teams per-machine downloads a huge amount of temporary/cache data during first launch just to immediately flush it again, and to be honest I am not entirely sure why or what kind of data is downloaded, especially not with the per-machine install. However if you are not configuring the correct exclusions, you might see your FSLogix Profile Container increase in size, as the temporary/cached Teams is written and flushed.
With a fresh FSLogix profile, I have seen the container expand to around 4-5GB in size when launching Teams, with writes going the the AppDataRoamingMicrosoftTeamsService WorkerCacheStorage folder. If you mount the profile container, when it’s not in use, you’ll find that there’s only around 400-800MB of data in the container, and nothing or very few small files in the AppDataRoamingMicrosoftTeamsService WorkerCacheStorage folder.

As with any other profile exclusions, you should of course do some testing, before implementing in a production environment

UPDATE – 14-07-2020 (july 14, 2020):
If you are using FSLogix Office Container, do not include Teams data in the Office Container, as the exclusions mentioned will no apply to the Office Container, they only apply to the Profile Container.
This means that you should either leave this policy at not configured or configured it as disabled:

UPDATE – 19-05-2020 (may 19, 2020):
The list of exclusions, below, has once again been updated. Via a Citrix discussions forum post, I have been made aware that certain exclusions are breaking things.
Excluding “AppDataLocalMicrosoftTeamscurrentresourceslocales” apparently breaks the system tray menu
.
Excluding “AppDataLocalMicrosoftTeamsCurrentLocales” apparently breaks SSO to Teams.
Do not add the folders with a strikethrough. If you do, test, test, test!

Exclusions:
AppDataLocalMicrosoftTeamsPackagesSquirrelTemp
AppDataLocalMicrosoftTeamscurrentresourceslocales
AppDataLocalMicrosoftTeamsCurrentLocales
AppDataRoamingMicrosoftTeamsService WorkerCacheStorage
AppDataRoamingMicrosoftTeamsApplication Cache
AppDataRoamingMicrosoftTeamsCache
AppDataRoamingMicrosoft TeamsLogs

AppDataRoamingMicrosoftTeamsMedia-Stack
AppDataRoamingMicrosoftTeams*.txt (Cannot be implemented with FSLogix Profile Container, as it does not support file exclusion or exclusions based on wildcards)

Citrix workspace add in

UPDATE – 03-05-2020 (march 3, 2020):
The list of exclusions, below, has been updated. According to the Microsoft Teams documentation the AppDataRoamingMicrosoftTeamsMedia-Stack should be excluded and the same goes with AppDataRoamingMicrosoftTeams*.txt files

Teams Outlook Add-in

For some reason the Teams per-machine Outlook add-in is not loaded, so when a user launches Outlook and wants to arrange a new Teams meeting, the Teams add-in is simply not there, and it’s nowhere to be found in the list of available add-ins:

I would expect the add-in to be between the Skype add-in and the OneNote add-in, but it’s not. I am not entirely sure what is going on here, but I have found a workaround which should bring the Teams add-in back.

UPDATE – 03-05-2020 (march 3, 2020):
Teams has to be launched at least once to be able to access the Teams plugin. This means that even if you activate the plugin in Outlook,during first logon, it does not work until Teams is launched. For now I haven’t found any solution to that issue.

Citrix Workspace Add Shortcut To Desktop

The workaround is a minor registry change in HKCU, configuring the LoadBehavior value for Microsoft Outlook add-ins:
Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_CURRENT_USERSoftwareMicrosoftOfficeOutlookAddInsTeamsAddin.FastConnect]
“Description”=”Microsoft Teams Meeting Add-in for Microsoft Office”
“LoadBehavior”=dword:00000003
“FriendlyName”=”Microsoft Teams Meeting Add-in for Microsoft Office”

This should bring back the Teams outlook add-in. We can, once again, use our trusted Citrix WEM to do the import where we’ll create a nice little action group, with the Teams shortcut and the registry values like this:

Apply the Teams Auto Start filter rule we created earlier, in this way we have everything around Teams in one single group.

Citrix Workspace Install Add Account

And here is the highly demanded Teams outlook add-in:

Citrix HDX Optimization

The last thing we need to do is to make sure that Citrix HDX Optimization has kicked in.

The Teams HDX Optimization is supported in Citrix Virtual Apps and Desktops 1906.2 and later and you’ll also have to use Citrix Workspace App 1907, however Citrix strongly recommends using Citrix Workspace App 1912 or 2002. You will also need Teams version 1.2.00.31357, however Citrix recommends version 1.3.00 .4461 or later.
Refer to this article for additional information:
https://support.citrix.com/article/CTX253754

If all of the above mentioned criteria have been met, you should see a “Citrix HDX Optimized” notification in Teams (in about -> version):

The Teams HDX Optimization enables Teams video and audio calls to be offloaded to the local endpoint device, this feature offloads a considerable amount of CPU usage on the Session Host/VDI to the endpoint. Be aware that the Teams HDX Optimization feature is not available on Linux based devices, at the moment it’s only supported on Windows devices.

Thank you for reading. If you have any questions feel free to contact me via Twitter, LinkedIN or in the World of EUC Slack channel.

Citrix Workspace app is here to replace Citrix Receiver with a new UI and capabilities (primarily for Citrix Cloud customers). Here’s how to deploy it across various supported platforms in a modern management capacity with Microsoft Intune.

Windows 10

There are multiple deployment options for Workspace app on Windows via Microsoft Intune:

  • Workspace app from the Microsoft Store. This version has some feature limitations but requires the least amount of effort to deploy
  • The full Workspace app that provides the best compatibility, but doesn’t ship as a Windows Installer file and therefore requires custom solutions to deploy

Microsoft Store

Adding the Workspace app from the Microsoft Store is well documented and should take only 5 minutes to get the app from the Store, synchronise to Intune and assign the app to your users. How’s that for done and dusted? - I’m sure you’ve got better things to do than package and maintain applications.

Citrix Workspace in the Microsoft Store

The Workspace app can be assigned as available for end-users to install via the Intune Company Portal or required for automatic deployment. Once deployed, the Store will take care of updates, thus there is no further action required by the administrator.

Citrix Workspace app in the Microsoft Intune Company Portal

If you have already deployed Citrix Receiver from the Microsoft Store via Intune, it should be automatically updated to Citrix Workspace. One they key feature limitations of the Microsoft Store version is pass-through authentication, so you might need to consider alternative deployment options

PowerShell

The Workspace app installer is a single executable just it has been with Citrix Receiver. This presents a challenge to deploy Workspace app as a line-of-business application with Intune which requires Win32 applications to be packaged as a single Windows Installer file. PowerShell scripts are a simple alternative, but deploying applications via PowerShell has two key considerations:

  • PowerShell scripts can’t be applied to computer groups
  • PowerShell scripts are executed on devices only when an Azure Active Directory user is signed in to the device

Deploying this way also means that the Workspace app will be deployed regardless of user choice and of course does not support deployment via the Intune Company Portal.

Like we’ve done previously with Citrix Receiver, the Workspace app can be deployed to Windows 10 machines via Intune with PowerShell without requiring custom packaging. We need a consistent URL that will always download the latest version of Workspace app and a command line to perform a silent installation. Your command line options might differ depending on your target environment, but the example script below will download and install the Workspace app.

Once deployed, devices must then rely on auto-updates to ensure that Workspace app is kept up-to-date.

How To Add Citrix Workspace

Re-package Citrix Workspace app for Windows Installer

With the right tools and a bit of effort, Citrix Workspace app can be re-packaged into a single Windows Installer file. Once you’ve packaged the app with this method you’ll need to maintain the package and update it regularly. As with the PowerShell method though, auto-updates will keep Workspace app up-to-date once deployed.

Is this approach right for you? This requires maintaining and deploying a custom package and is dependent on how the environment is managed and available skillsets. Only you can answer that for your projects or environments. A custom package isn’t ideal and I recommend using the Microsoft Store version as the default approach instead.

Citrix Workspace app extracted Windows Installer files

HDX RealTime Media Engine

The Citrix HDX RealTime Media Engine - required for optimising Skype for Business under XenApp and XenDesktop, does come as a single Windows Installer file. This makes it easy then to deploy the engine to Windows PCs as a Required line-of-business application without modification or custom packaging. This will ensure that no user interaction is required to install the engine since most users are unlikely to know what it does anyway.

Bonus: Citrix Workspace app for Chrome

If you have Google Chrome deployed in your environment and you’d like to deploy the Citrix Workspace app for Chrome, this can be achieved with a PowerShell script that will either deploy it as a preference that users must approve or as a policy that will be automatically pushed out and users will be unable to remove from Chrome.

Google provides detailed documentation on deploying Chrome extensions on Windows.

Here’s a basic script to deploy Workspace app for Chrome via PowerShell that uses the app’s Chrome Web Store identifier (haiffjcadagjlijoggckpgfnoeiflnem) to tell Chrome to install the app on next launch. This shows both approaches - deploy as a preference or enforced.

Add the script to the Intune portal and assign to a user group to deploy. Ensure the script runs in the system context because it needs to write to HKLM.

macOS

The Citrix Workspace app can be deployed as a line-of-business application with Microsoft Intune. The Workspace app download comes as an Installer package (inside an Apple Disk Image) that can be converted into suitable file format with the Microsoft Intune App Wrapping Tool, ready to deploy with Intune.

The Citrix Workspace app disk image

Convert the Installer

Citrix Workspace Add Account Message

Instructions for converting a .pkg file to a .intunemac file are outlined in the documentation, and the basic process I have followed to convert the Citrix Workspace app installer file is:

  1. Download the Intune App Wrapping Tool for Mac executable - IntuneAppUtil - to a local folder. I’ve downloaded it to ~/bin.
  2. Mark the file as executable. In my example, I’ve done this with:
  1. Optionally copy the Install Citrix Workspace.pkg file to a local folder. You should also be able to run the converter against the copy stored in the disk image. In my example, I’ve copied the installer to ~/Projects/Intune-Apps. Rename the installer to remove spaces, so rename the file to InstallCitrixWorkspace.pkg.

Note: Removing the spaces from the installer name before converting is important, otherwise when installing the application, macOS will report the following error and the installing will fail to download and install:

  1. Convert the .pkg file into the required .intunemac format with a command similar to the following example - note that the -o switch should include a directory path only.

If successful the command line will look similar to the following screenshot:

Converting the Citrix Workspace app with IntuneAppUtil

The Workspace app installer will have been converted into a .intunemac format ready to import into the Intune portal for distributing to users.

The converted Citrix Workspace app

Distribute with Intune

With the prepared package, create a new line-of-business app in the Intune portal, select the .intunemac file and enter application information as follows:

  • Name - Citrix Workspace
  • Description - copy and paste the description from Workspace app on the Microsoft Store
  • Publisher - Citrix
  • Ignore app version - Yes
  • Category - Business or Productivity
  • Information URL - https://docs.citrix.com/en-us/citrix-workspace-app-for-mac.html
  • Privacy URL - https://www.citrix.com.au/about/legal.html
  • Logo - download the Workspace app icon in PNG format here

Once the details have been added, click OK to create the application. I initially had issues with uploading the application on Chrome on macOS. I was successful on Internet Explorer.

Adding the Citrix Workspace app as a line-of-business app in Microsoft Intune

Once the application has been created and assigned to users, it will be available for install in the Intune Company Portal. The application can also be set to required for automatic deployment.

Citrix Workspace Add In Browser

Citrix Workspace available in the Intune Company Portal on macOS*

Just as on Windows, updates to the Citrix Workspace app can be managed with the inbuilt updater, post-deployment.

HDX RealTime Media Engine

The Citrix HDX RealTime Media Engine is also available as an installer package that can be converted and deployed the same way as Workspace itself. Citrix Workspace app is now a 64-bit macOS application and will, therefore, require a 64-bit version of the HDX RealTime Media Engine. Right now, a 64-bit HDX RealTime Media Engine is in tech preview that can be downloaded, packaged, uploaded as a line-of-business application and assigned.

iOS

As at the time of writing, Citrix Receiver is still available on the iOS App Store and we should see it updated to Citrix Workspace app soon. Adding an iOS application in Microsoft Intune is, fortunately, a simple process:

  1. Add an application and choose ‘Store app - iOS’, then search the app store
  2. Search for ‘Citrix’, ‘Citrix Receiver’ or ‘Citrix Workspace’
  3. Choose ‘Citrix Receiver’ or ‘Citrix Workspace’ depending on what is returned
  4. Save the change and Add the application
  5. Assign the application as required

The application will be available in the Intune Company Portal:

Citrix Workspace for iOS available in the Intune Company Portal

For existing deployments of Citrix Receiver, they should be updated to Citrix Workspace app automatically.

Android

Android Store app

At the time of writing, the Workspace app for Android is not available in the Google Play Store, but a tech preview is available for download as an APK. I would recommend deploying Citrix Receiver via the Google Play Store, but with access to an APK file, you can deploy Android applications directly to enrolled devices as a line-of-business application with Intune.

The process for deploying Citrix Workspace app or Citrix Receiver on Android follows the standard Android store app deployment steps:

  1. Add an application and choose ‘Store app - Android’, then search the app store
  2. Name - ‘Citrix Workspace’ or ‘Citrix Receiver’
  3. Description - copy and paste the description from Workspace app on the Microsoft Store
  4. Publisher - Citrix
  5. Appstore URL - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.citrix.Receiver
  6. Minimum operating system - Android 4.4 (Kitkat)
  7. Category - Business or Productivity
  8. Privacy URL - https://www.citrix.com.au/about/legal.html
  9. Logo - download the Workspace app icon in PNG format here

Assign the application and it will be available to users in the Intune Company Portal.

Android Work Profile app

In the future, it’s more likely that organisations will leverage the Android enterprise capabilities, previously known as Android for Work. This also simplifies Android app deployment with a connection between Microsoft Intune and the Google Play store. Once configured, browse the Google Play store, approve a list of desired apps and these will then appear for assignment in the Mobile Apps node in Intune.

Citrix Workspace Add In

Here’s Citrix Receiver in the Google Play store.

Approving Citrix Receiver in the Google Play store*

Once approved, you must choose how new permissions will be approved:

Citrix Workspace Add In Google Chrome

  • Keep approved when app requests new permissions - Users will be able to install the updated app. (Default)
  • Revoke app approval when this app requests new permissions - App will be removed from the store until it is reapproved.

You can approve and deploy Citrix Receiver today, which should be automatically updated to Citrix Workspace app once it is released.

Wrap-up

In this article, I’ve covered the high-level steps required for deployment of the Citrix Workspace app across the various major platforms supported by Microsoft Intune. Mobile platforms, including the Microsoft Store on Windows 10, will require the least amount of administrative effort to configure, deploy and update. For most organisations supporting Windows as their primary platform, even with Microsoft Intune, the choice of deployment solution will depend on Workpace app feature requirements.