Avogadro's Number In Scientific Notation

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Scientists and engineers often work with very large or very small numbers, which are more easily expressed in exponential form or scientific notation. A classic chemistry example of a number written in scientific notation is Avogadro's number (6.022 x 10 23). Scientists commonly perform calculations using the speed of light (3.0 x 10 8 m/s). It is a name for a specific number of things. There are 12 things in a dozen, and 602 hexillion things in a mole. What are moles and why they are important? How to abbreviate the mole number (Avogadro's number) using scientific notation, and compare to see how giant this number is. Show Step-by-step Solutions. Avogadro's Number (6.02 x 10 23) These mole problems get the most confusing when Avogadro's Number enters the mix: lots of scientific notation, calculators going crazy.

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Avogadro's numberävōgä´drō [for Amedeo Avogadro], number of particles contained in one mole of any substance; it is equal to 602,252,000,000,000,000,000,000, or in scientific notation, 6.02252×10Notation23. For example, 12.011 grams of carbon (one mole of carbon) contains 6.02252×10

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23 carbon atoms, and 180.16 grams of glucose, C

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6H12O6, contains 6.02252×1023 molecules of glucose. Avogadro's number is determined by calculating the spacing of the atoms in a crystalline solid through X-ray methods and combining this data with the measured volume of one mole of the solid to obtain the number of molecules per molar volume.

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The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright © 2012, Columbia University Press. All rights reserved.

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