Avogadro's Number In Scientific Notation

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What Is A Mole?

This video covers what moles are, and how to create conversion factors for them. It also explains why your teacher is doing this 'moles thing' to you, which is a question I've heard from many a frustrated chem student. Trust me, there is a reason!

  • Use the EE or EXP key Scientific calculators have a special key for scientific notation numbers. It is either the EE or the EXP key and it represents the 'times ten' to some power (×10 x) part of scientific notation. So lets say we want to enter Avogadro's number which is 6.02 × 10 23. Here is how you do that.
  • Avogadro’s number, number of units in one mole of any substance (defined as its molecular weight in grams), equal to 6.02214076 × 10 23. The units may be electrons, atoms, ions, or molecules, depending on the nature of the substance and the character of the reaction (if any).See alsoAvogadro’s law.

The Avogadro's number is equal to (6,022 x 10 raised to 23 particles) and is symbolized in the formulas with the letters L or NA. In addition, it is used to make conversions between grams and atomic mass unit. The unit of measure of the Avogadro's number is the mole (mol-1) but it can also be defined in lb/mol-1 and oz/mol-1.

Converting Grams To Moles

Lots of great grams-to-moles and moles-to-grams action in this one. Moles are confusing at first, but once you see it's always a one-step problem, it gets nice and repetitive (and that's a good thing!). Also intriguing: what to do about molecules with crazy parentheses?

Avogadro

Avogadro's Number (6.02 x 1023)

These mole problems get the most confusing when Avogadro's Number enters the mix: lots of scientific notation, calculators going crazy. This video will make Avogadro make sense for you, though, and it covers the common calculator mistake that's responsible for almost all of the errors students make in this type of problem.

Avogadro's Number Chemistry Definition

Avogadro

Avogadro's Number In Scientific Notationn

Worksheet

Converting Grams to Number of Atoms or Molecules

The hardest problems are the ones going from grams all the way to number of atoms or molecules. The big trick that helps the most students involves looking at it as a basic stepping stone problem with 'moles in the middle', as I'll show you in this video. Also covered: a few more advanced moles problems with funky wording to give you a taste of what's to come.