Avogadro's Law For Gases

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In 1811, Amedeo Avogadro, who also studied the behaviour of gases when they react, proposed the law which states that: Equal volume of all gases at the same temperature and pressure contain the same number of molecules. The law shows that the volume occupied by a gas depends on the number of molecules it contains at a given temperature. Avogadro’s Law is one of the gas laws. At the beginning of the 19th century, an Italian scientist Lorenzo Romano Amedeo Carlo Avogadro studied the relationship between the volume and the amount of substance of gas present. The results of certain experiments with gases led him to formulate a well-known Avogadro’s Law.It states that, under the same conditions of temperature. Avogadro's gas law states the volume of a gas is proportional to the number of moles of gas present when the temperature and pressure are held constant. This example problem demonstrates how to use Avogadro's law to determine the volume of a gas when more gas is added to the system. This is the short and sweet correct answer. Strictly speaking, Avogadro's law is never true. It is approximately true for some gases, most notably the noble gases. But even the noble gases exhibit non-ideal behavior to some extent. $ endgroup$ – David Hammen Aug 2 '14 at 20:43. Description Avogadro’s law is an experimental gas law relating volume of a gas to the amount of substance of gas present. Avogadro’s law states that, “equal volumes of all gases, at the same temperature and pressure, have the same number of molecules”.

Description

Avogadro

Avogadro’s law is an experimental gas law relating volume of a gas to the amount of substance of gas present. Avogadro’s law states that, “equal volumes of all gases, at the same temperature and pressure, have the same number of molecules”.
For a given mass of an ideal gas, the volume and amount (moles) of the gas are directly proportional if the temperature and pressure are constant.
his law explains how, under the same condition of temperature and pressure, equal volumes of all gases contain the same number of molecules. For comparing the same substance under two different sets of conditions, the law can be also expressed as V1/V2=n1/n2.
The equation shows that, as the number of moles of gas increases, the volume of the gas also increases in proportion. Similarly, if the number of moles of gas is decreased, then the volume also decreases. Thus, the number of molecules or atoms in a specific volume of ideal gas is independent of their size or the molar mass of the gas.

Related formulas

Variables

V1volume of the gas under conditions 1 (m3)
n1amount of the gas under conditions 1 (mol)
V2volume of the gas under conditions 2 (m3)
n2amount of the gas under conditions 2 (mol)

Using Avogadro's Law

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