5 Speed Manual Transmission For Chevy 350

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General Motors is an innovator of automatic transmissions, introducing the Hydra-Matic in 1940.[1] This list includes some GM transmissions.

Oct 22, 2014 Yes. Only if the engine is the 4.3 V6 in the S-10. The 4.3 L V6 is a 350 with two cylinders designed out of it. The NV3500 rated at 300 Ft/lbs torque is just a tad below the 350's stock power output at 350 ft/lbs. The NV3500 does not have a separate bell housing. Just don't try a lot of wheelies with the 350 on it and you should be good. Manual Transmission, T-56 Super Magnum 6-Speed, 1.125 in. 26-spline Input, 31-spline Output, Aluminum Case, Chevy, Each Part Number: NAL-19352208 Not Yet Reviewed. SM420: For the old-school, ultra low geared crowd, the SM420 four-speed manual transmission is a great choice. Surprisingly well behaved on-road and absolutely burley off-road, the SM420 is a cool box of gears. If you think a transmission designed in the 1940's is an anachronism, you are right, and a very neat one at that. Drivetrain catalog offering discounted GM 3, 4, and 5 speed manual transmission parts for cars and pickup trucks and troubleshooting help! How to identify chevrolet gmc manual transmissions.

Automatic transmissions[edit]

Early models[edit]

The GM Hydra-Matic was a success and installed in the majority of GM models by 1950. Through the 1950s, all makers were working on their own automatic transmission, with four more developed inside GM alone. All of GM's early automatic transmissions were replaced by variants of the Turbo-Hydramatic by the 1970s.

  • 1940–1967 Hydra-Matic — Oldsmobile (now the trade name for all GM automatic transmissions)
  • 1948–1963 Dynaflow — Buick
  • 1950–1973 Powerglide — Chevrolet (also used by Pontiac, Holden, Vauxhall and Opel)
  • 1968-1971 Torquedrive- Chevrolet ( Camaro and Chevy II, Nova. Manually shifted on Column. )
  • 1957–1961 Turboglide — Chevrolet (V8 models only, except Corvette)
  • 1958–1959 Flightpitch — Buick
  • 1961–1963 Dual Path Turbine Drive — Buick
  • 1961–1964 Roto Hydramatic — Oldsmobile/Pontiac (also used by Holden)
  • 1964–1969 Super Turbine 300 — Buick/Oldsmobile/Pontiac (Oldsmobile Jetaway)
  • 1968–1969 Torquedrive — Chevrolet (manually column shifted 2 speed automatic, 6 cyl only)
  • 1956-1964 4 speed Controlled coupling HydraMatic, also known as Cadillac 315 or P 315 HydraMatic, Oldsmobile Jetaway, Pontiac Super HydraMatic.
  • TempestTorque, ( Pontiac) a two speed based on Powerglide, but having the added feature of ' Split Torque ' dividing the engine power between mechanical connection and the torque converter in high gear.

Turbo-Hydramatic[edit]

The Turbo-Hydramatic was used by all GM divisions, and formed the basis for the company's modern Hydramatic line. The basic rear-wheel drive Turbo-Hydramatic spawned two front-wheel drive variants, the transverseTurbo-Hydramatic 125, and the longitudinalTurbo-Hydramatic 425. A third variant was the light-duty rear wheel drive Turbo-Hydramatic 180 used in many European models.

Heavy-duty rear wheel drive
  • 1971–1994 3L80HD (heavy duty version of TH400)
Medium-duty rear wheel drive
  • 1964–1992 Super Turbine 400/TH400/3L80
  • 1969–1986 TH350/TH350C/TH375B/TH250/TH250C
  • 1972–1976 TH375 — Light duty version of TH400
  • 1976–1987 TH200/TH200C
  • 1981–1990 TH200-4R
  • 1982–1993 TH700R4/4L60
Light-duty rear wheel drive
  • 1969–1998 TH180/TH180C/3L30 — 3-speed European/Asian model. Also manufactured and used by Holden as the Trimatic transmission.
Transverse front wheel drive
  • 1980–1999 TH125/TH125C/3T40 — 3-speed light-duty
  • 1984–1994 TH440-T4/4T60 — 4-speed medium-duty
Longitudinal front wheel drive
  • 1966–1978 TH425 — 3-speed
  • 1979–1981 TH325 — 3-speed
  • 1982–1985 TH325-4L — 4-speed

Electronic Hydra-Matics[edit]

The next-generation transmissions, introduced in the early 1990s, were the electronic Hydra-Matics based on the Turbo-Hydramatic design. Most early electronic transmissions use the '-E' designator to differentiate them from their non-electronic cousins, but this has been dropped on transmissions with no mechanical version like the new GM 6L80 transmission.

Today, GM uses a simple naming scheme for their transmissions, with the 'Hydra-Matic' name used on most automatics across all divisions.

3/4/5/6L/T##-Elll
Number of forward gearsL=Longitudinal
T=Transverse
GVWR rating'E' for Electronic
'HD' for Heavy Duty
First-generation longitudinal (Rear Wheel drive)
  • 1991–2001 4L30-E — 4-speed light-duty (used in BMW, Cadillac, Isuzu, and Opel cars)
  • 1992– 4L60-E/4L65-E — 4-speed medium-duty (used in GM trucks and rear-wheel-drive cars)
  • 1991– 4L80-E/4L85-E — 4-speed heavy-duty (used in GM trucks)
First-generation transverse (Front Wheel drive)
  • 1995–2010 4T40-E/4T45-E — 4-speed light-duty (used in smaller front wheel drive GM vehicles)
  • 1991–2010 4T60-E/4T65-E/4T65E-HD — 4-speed medium-duty (used in larger front wheel drive GM vehicles)
  • 1993–2010 4T80-E — 4-speed heavy-duty (used in large front wheel drive GM vehicles, only with Cadillac NorthStar V8.
Second-generation longitudinal (Rear Wheel drive)
  • 2000–2007 5L40-E/5L50 — 5-speed medium-duty (used in Cadillac's Sigma vehicles)
  • 2007–present 6L45/6L50 — 6-speed medium-duty (used in GM Sigma platform cars)
  • 2006–present: 6L80/6L90 — 6-speed heavy-duty (used in GM trucks and performance cars)
  • 2014–present: 8L90 — 8-speed heavy-duty (used in GM trucks and performance cars)
  • 2016–present: 8L45 — 8-speed light-duty (used in GM luxury cars)
  • 2017–present: 10L80 - Ford-GM 10-speed automatic transmission (used in GM light trucks including pickups and related SUVs)
  • 2017–present: 10L90 - Ford-GM 10-speed automatic transmission (used in GM performance cars)

*This transmission is part of a joint-venture between General Motors and Ford Motor Company to split development of two transmissions, a longitudinal 10-speed and transverse 9-speed. Ford led the design of the 10-speed transmission, as well as filing the design patents for said transmission. According to an official report by the SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers) the design of the 10-speed gearbox is essentially all Ford, while GM was responsible for designing the 9-speed 9T transverse automatic gearbox. As part of their joint-venture, Ford will let GM use the 10-speed transmission with rights to modify and manufacture it for their own applications. In-exchange for Ford's 10-speed transmission, General Motors will let Ford use its 9-speed transmission for front-wheel drive applications; Ford ultimately declined use of the 9T.[2][3][4]

Second-generation transverse (Front Wheel drive)
  • 2008–present: 6T30/6T40/6T45 — 6-speed light-duty
  • 2006–present: 6T70/6T75 — 6-speed medium-duty
  • 2016–present: 9T50/9T65 Hydra-Matic – 9-speed[5]

Hybrid and PHEV[edit]

  • 2ML70 - 2-Mode Hybrid transmission.
  • 4ET50 (MKA) - Electric Drive Unit Transaxle (First Generation Chevrolet Volt / Cadillac ELR)
  • 5ET50 (MKV) - Electronically controlled, continuously-variable automatic transaxle (Second Generation Chevrolet Volt)[6]
  • 5ET50 (MKE) - Electronically controlled, continuously-variable automatic transaxle Transaxle (Full Hybrid, Ninth Generation Chevrolet Malibu)[7]
  • 4EL70 (MRD) - Electric Drive Unit Transmission (PHEV Cadillac CT6)

Other automatics[edit]

  • Aisin AF33 — 5-speed transverse automatic made by Aisin AW Co., Ltd.
  • Allison 1000 Series — 6-speed longitudinal automatic made by Allison Transmission
  • Saturn MP6/MP7 — 4-speed automatic developed by Saturn for use in the S-series from 1991 to 2002
  • VTi transmission — continuously variable transmission
  • Tremec M1L transmission — 8-speed Dual-Clutch made by Tremec for the Chevrolet Corvette C8
  • GM CVT250 — continuously variable transmission

Future[edit]

Manual transmissions[edit]

Longitudinal transmissions[edit]

  • Aisin AR5/MA5 — 5-speed longitudinal manual made by Aisin
  • Aisin AY6 — 6-speed longitudinal manual made by Aisin
  • Getrag 260 — 5-speed longitudinal manual made by Getrag
  • Muncie M20 — 4-speed longitudinal wide ratio manual transmission made by GM at their Muncie, Indiana factory
  • Muncie M21 — 4-speed longitudinal close ratio manual transmission made by GM at their Muncie, Indiana factory
  • Muncie M22 — 4-speed longitudinal heavy duty close ratio manual transmission made by GM at their Muncie, Indiana factory
  • Saginaw M26/27 transmission — 3 and 4-speed longitudinal light duty (less than 300 hp wide ratio manual transmission made by GM at their Saginaw, Michigan factory
  • Muncie M62/M64 — 3-speed longitudinal transmission made by GM
  • Muncie SM420 — 4-speed manual used up to 1967, very similar to sm 465 except small changes to gear ratios and location of reverse.
  • New Process Gear NP435 - 4-speed longitudinal transmission used in a select handful of 67-72 GM pickups
  • New Process Gear A833 RPO MY6 or MM7 — 4-speed longitudinal A833 overdrive transmission made by New Process Gear for early to mid 1980s General Motors Light Trucks
  • Muncie SM465 — 4-speed longitudinal manual used in 68- 91 Chevy 1/2 3/4 and 1 ton trucks
  • New Venture Gear NV1500 — 5-speed longitudinal manual made by New Venture Gear
  • New Venture Gear 3500/4500 — 5-speed longitudinal manual made by New Venture Gear
  • Borg-Warner T-10 transmission — 4-speed longitudinal manual currently made by Richmond Gear; originally made by Borg-Warner
  • Tremec T-5 — 5-speed longitudinal manual currently made by Tremec; originally made by Borg-Warner
  • Borg-Warner T-50 transmission — 5-speed longitudinal manual - used by GM in its H Body cars and a few other limited light duty applications from 1976 to 1978;
  • Tremec T-56 — 6-speed longitudinal manual overdrive made by Tremec; formerly made by Borg-Warner
  • Tremec TR-6060 — 6-speed longitudinal manual overdrive made by Tremec
  • ZF S6-650 — 6-speed longitudinal manual made by ZF Friedrichshafen
  • Tremec TR-6070 — 7-speed longitudinal manual overdrive made by Tremec

Transverse Transmissions[edit]

  • F23 — 5-speed transverse manual manufactured by Getrag
  • F35 — 5-speed transverse manual manufactured by Saab in Gothenburg, Sweden
  • F40 — 6-speed transverse manual manufactured by FGP Germany
  • Getrag 282 — 5-speed transverse manual designed by Getrag and manufactured by Muncie Getrag
  • Getrag 284 — 5-speed transverse manual designed by Getrag and manufactured by Muncie Getrag
  • MP2/MP3 — 5-speed manual developed by Saturn for use in the S-Series from 1991 to 2002

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^'Hydra-Matic History: The First Automatic Transmission'. Ate Up With Motor. 2010-05-29. Retrieved 2014-01-15.
  2. ^'Exclusive: An Inside Look At Ford's New 10 Speed Transmission'. http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/. Retrieved 2015-03-16.External link in publisher= (help)
  3. ^Brooke, Lindsay. 'Ford and GM finally consummate 9- and 10-speed joint development'. articles.sae. SAE International. Retrieved 20 March 2016.
  4. ^'Ford passes on GM's 9-speed automatic transmission'. Retrieved 2018-11-12.
  5. ^Panait, Mircea. 'GM Hydra-Matic 9T50 Transmission Confirmed for Chevrolet Cruze, Malibu, Equinox'. autoevolution. Retrieved 2016-12-07.
  6. ^'GM Service Insights, pg 23'(PDF). Archived from the original(PDF) on 2019-01-09. Retrieved 2019-07-16.
  7. ^'GM Service Insights, pg 23'(PDF). Archived from the original(PDF) on 2019-01-09. Retrieved 2019-07-16.
Retrieved from 'https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_GM_transmissions&oldid=999889435'

What transmission is right for me?

Your transmission and engine combination is very important. Your vehicles weight and how you drive it are also a major factor. Transmissions come in two basic types, Automatic and Manual:

Automatic

TH350

Best transmission choice, hands down.

The Turbo Hydra-matic 350 was first used in 1969 model cars. It was developed jointly by Buick and Chevrolet to replace the two-speed Super Turbine 300 and aluminum case Powerglide transmissions. So, although it carries the Turbo Hydra-matic name, the Hydra-matic Division of General Motors had little, if anything, to do with its design. The 350 and its 250, 250c, 350c and 375b derivatives have been manufactured by Buick in its Flint, Michigan, plant and by Chevrolet in Toledo and Parma, Ohio, and Windsor, Ontario. Both Chevrolet and Buick divisions produced the TH350. For the 1981 model year, a lock-up torque converter was introduced which coincided with the new EMC control of most GM cars; This version is the THM350-C, this transmission was phased out in 1984 in GM passenger cars for the 700R4. Chevrolet/GMC trucks and vans used the THM350-C until 1986. The lock-up torque converter was unpopular with transmission builders B&M Racing once marketed a conversion kit for THM350-Cs during the early 1980s until the advent of high stall lock-up torque converters when its overdrive counterpart (THM700R4/4L60) were modified.

Gear123R
Ratio2.521.521.001.93

Pros

  • Excellent gear spread between all three gears.
  • Very low cost to build up to various levels of power handling.
  • Can be built up to extreme power handling capabilities.
  • Most all transmission shops are capable of building these to at least level 1 or 2.
  • No TV cable to deal with.
  • Stall converters are low in cost, and the selection is broad.
  • Very reliable and simple to repair if needed.

Cons

  • Select a final gear that will allow you the best overall performance and one that allows a decent off the line acceleration, and one that will be in a tolerable rpm range at highway speed. You must have the correct stall converter for optimal performance. This can make a huge difference in the way your vehicle accelerates.
  • One THM350 weak point was excessive end-play between the pump and center support and resulting wobble of the direct clutch drum due to both the end play and use of a relatively narrow bushing in the drum. Add an extra thrust washer between the planetary gear and direct clutch to remove the end play and using a wider aftermarket bushing in the direct clutch drum.
  • The relatively thin center support and lightweight matching splines in the case cause some people to beef up the case with an aftermarket case saver kit.
  • These are becoming scarce, but there are still plenty of them around, and high performance parts are easily obtained.
  • You may have to go through this long story to your less than knowledgeable friends as to why you didn't choose a 700R4, and when you explain it to them, they may still think you don't know what you’re talking about.
5 speed manual transmission for chevy 350 for sale

TH400

Better than a stock TH350, more expensive to build compared to TH350.

Gear123R
Ratio2.481.481.002.07
Used chevy 5 speed transmission

Pros

  • Excellent gear spread. Very similar to a TH350.
  • Strong internal parts.
  • Reliable.
  • Simple to build or repair to stock buildup levels.

Cons

  • Very expensive to build up to higher power handling levels, as compared to a TH350. The TH350 has far more high performance parts available at reasonable costs. The 400 trans. is not a practical choice.
  • Internal rotating parts (cast iron drum) are very heavy and create a huge drag compared to most any other trans., and this is not a subtle amount of drag. The TH400 is well known to be a heavier duty trans. than a TH350 but this heavy duty factor was designed more for heavy vehicles that may encounter pulling heavy loads. Only the largest of the GM cars weighing around 5000 lbs had these trans. in them, along with heavy duty pickups, usually 3/4 ton or larger trucks. Even the half ton Chevy trucks didn't come with these in them.
  • They will certainly hold up better than a stock built TH350, but they are not a desirable trans. for a street rod. You can build a TH350 to level two that would be superior to any stock TH400 in every way for about the same cost. Building a TH400 to a high hp handling level will cost a great deal of money.
  • You will never see this trans in a true Pro-Street car.

Powerglide

Only two gears, best suited for very light vehicles, under 1800 lbs. The Powerglide is a two-speed automatic transmission designed by General Motors. It was available primarily on Chevrolet from January 1950 through 1973, although some Pontiac models also used this automatic transmission after the fire at the Hydra-Matic factory in 1953.

350 Chevy Transmission For Sale

Gear12R
Ratio1.761.001.76

Pros

  • Excellent transmission to build up to just about any power handling level.
  • Most trans. shops are able to build this trans with ease.
  • Very reliable, and simple to work on. Not much to go wrong.
  • Decent first to second gear spread.
  • Rotational drag is very low with this trans., moreso than any automatic on the market. Very efficient trans.
  • Stall converters are not expensive and many choices available.

Cons

  • Two gears, that's the problem. This trans. can only be run in cars that have a very high hp to weight ratio. It would be fair to say a vehicle weighing approx. 3400 lbs would require an engine output of 1000 hp or more to make it a rational choice, and even then, you would still need a decent final gear to get things moving off the line. The first gear in these is somewhat tall. Those running a T-Bucket roadster weighing around 1800 lbs. with a 500 hp or higher engine could make great use of a Powerglide trans.
  • Having only two gears limits having the best of both worlds when it comes to off the line acceleration and cruising at highway speed.

700R4

Worst possible transmission choice.

Gear1234R
Ratio3.061.631.000.702.29

Pros

  • None, other than there are plenty of them around for a cheap price, and for good reason.
  • Fuel injection does make this trans. more tolerable.
  • It will get you from point A to point B period!

Cons

  • Very wide first to second gear spread. First gear is a 3.06 ratio Second is a 1.62 ratio. This nearly equates to skipping from first to third gear with a manual trans. This kills acceleration when these trans go into second gear on a carbureted engine with a healthy cam and large runner intake manifold. Compare this to a TH350. First gear at 2.52 ratio and second gear is 1.52 do the math.
  • The 3.06 first gear is so low that any final gear of above 3.55 or numerically higher will have you right at the max rpm at around 35 mph, only to then have your car fall on its face when it hits second gear, feeling like it skipped a gear. Wheel spin is uncontrollable upon hard launches, unless you have a very tall final gear, and then you can for sure count on going nowhere quickly when second gear comes in. Overdrive would be totally useless at highway speed regardless of detuning with a tall final gear, unless you were cruising at around 100 mph.
  • Huge cost to build up to a decent street rod level. Don't even consider a stock rebuild to handle 500 hp or more. Under hard use, the 700R4 will fail quickly.
  • Limited as to what level these can be built up to. High performance transmission builders and parts suppliers don't even recognize this as a serious transmission.
  • More complex to build than a TH350 and far more expensive, especially when built up to handle high hp numbers.
  • Having to run a cumbersome throttle value cable to the carb. linkage. This feature actually serves a good purpose, but if not set properly, it can destroy your transmission quickly. Very critical adjustment, and often overlooked.
  • The overdrive is actually useless with engines running decent size cams relative to the cubic inch, especially with large runner dual plane intakes, and single plane intakes are out of the question with this trans.
  • Stall converters are double the cost of the one run in a TH350.
  • This is not a reliable transmission in a street rod.
  • Lowers the value of your vehicle to some degree, especially on high hp builds. These transmissions do not belong in most carbureted street rods. You must detune an engine considerably to operate the overdrive and be able to tolerate the first to second gear drop.
  • Could be classified as the worst mismatch of parts known on a true street rod.
  • As a side note, I would like to mention that most of us have owned a regular stock street car with a 700R4 trans, or its electronic likeness, a 4L60E, and didn't find much of an issue with the way they operated, especially if the vehicle was fuel injected. This is because stock car engines are designed to operate totally different in the very low rpm range. They have huge amounts of off idle torque compared to the average carbureted street rod that makes 400 hp or more. This off idle instant torque allows the vehicle to keep its speed up decently when the 700R4 drops into second gear, and the same low rpm also allows the overdrive gear to operate normally at very low rpm. There are other factors that also allow these trans. to operate at low rpm, especially on fuel injected computer driven engines.

GM200

Most all the cons you see for the 700R4 exist within the GM200

Gear123R
Ratio2.741.571.0002.07

Pros

5 Speed Manual Transmission For Chevy 350

  • Has a better gear spread than the 700R4 but not as optimal as the TH350.
  • Not much good to say about this trans. It certainly has a place in some special late model applications, but old school Chevy engines is not one of them.

Cons

  • This transmission can cost up to three times more to build up to a decent power handling level compared to a built up TH350.
  • Cannot hold up to high torque engine builds unless an enormous amount of money is spent on this trans.
  • This trans is not a reliable trans. compared to any of the early GM trans.

4L60-E

Electronically controlled trans. Most of the same issues as the 700R4. Terrible choice to run in an old school carbureted engine.

Gear1234R
Ratio3.0591.6251.0000.6962.29

Pros

  • No TV cable to deal with or shifting linkage. It has pump pressure control and shifting via electronics.
  • Not much good to say about this expensive trans. It is virtually a 700R4 with a modern twist.

Cons

  • Very expensive to build up to a high power handling level. Can cost up to $4,000 to build this trans up to a decent level. Computer controlled engines may require this unless you bypass the car’s computer system.
  • Complex. Very complex!
  • Pointless to run such a terrible transmission.
  • If you insist on such a trans, the 4L80-E is a better choice, as it has a normal gear spread, and is a much stronger trans. Still pointless to use with an old school carbureted engine.

Manual

Four and Five speed Manual

Don't forget to upgrade your clutch and flywheel components.
350

Pros

  • High quality manual transmissions can be very expensive.
  • Excellent acceleration at any speed due to many selective gear ratios. Finding a gear at any cruising speed to hit it hard is easily accomplished with a manual compared to an automatic.
  • More efficient delivery of horsepower to the rear wheels with a manual trans. versus an automatic. In other words, less loss of power due to slippage as encountered with an automatic transmission.
  • For some people, the fun factor of shifting gears is one of the high points of owning a street rod.
  • Very reliable, long lasting. Low maintenance. Simple to change out a clutch if needed.

Cons

350 chevy transmission for sale

5 Speed Manual Transmission For Chevy 350

  • Can be very expensive to purchase a high quality modern manual trans. and high performance clutch and flywheel, especially the Tremec Series.
  • Can be somewhat complex to change over from an auto to a manual trans.
  • If you think your car is going to run faster with a manual versus an auto, you will be greatly disappointed. The automatic transmission can not only shift much faster, but off line acceleration can be controlled to a much greater degree. This is why most drag cars have automatic transmissions. All things equal, a car equipped with an auto trans will outrun one equipped with a regular street rod manual with great ease.
  • Missing gears when racing can cause damage to your engine, and loss of control of your vehicle should you drop into the previous gear during an aggressive run. Been there a couple times, dropped a valve in brand new Lotus Esprit shifting out of second into first rather than third, and locked up the back wheels on a Dodge Viper shifting into second rather than fourth at high speed. Nearly lost control of the car at around 80 mph.
  • If you’re deciding to run a 5 or 6 speed manual trans because of the overdrive gear, be aware that most engines built with large lopey cams, and single plane intakes running a carb will usually not allow effective use of the overdrive gear.
  • Tremec T56 transmissions are very popular and highly advanced. They are expensive. They tend to be notchy to shift when new. Takes many miles before they become easy to shift. They can be difficult to install in some early model classic cars, as they are huge compared to early model transmissions. They can cost a great deal of money to rebuild if needed. Still about the best manual trans out there, and can handle very high horsepower levels.