2006 Chevy Impala Transmission

Posted on  by admin

By Chris Adams, Lead Diagnostician

RockAuto ships auto parts and body parts from over 300 manufacturers to customers' doors worldwide, all at warehouse prices. Easy to use parts catalog. Equip cars, trucks & SUVs with 2006 Chevrolet Impala Transmission from AutoZone. Get Yours Today! We have the best products at the right price.

Chris Adams started with Certified in 1986 as an R&R technician. He has an Associate Degree in Automotive Technology from SCC in Milford, NE. He also holds the ASE master tech with the L1 certification. Currently he is our diagnostic trainer and is responsible for keeping our diagnostic techs at the retail locations at the top of their field, and keeping current with all the latest trends and tools in our industry. Chris also works closely with the technical dept at the remanufacturing plant and helps coordinate our fleet of research and development vehicles for testing.

Recently a 2006 Chevrolet Impala came into one of our retail locations with a surge complaint while cruising on the highway between 60-65 mph. I drove the vehicle with the customer to verify the concern and was able to duplicate the circumstances in which the vehicle acted up. While watching the tachometer I noted that there was a noticeable 150-200 rpm surge while TCC was applied. It felt like a typical TCC surge as a result from a leak in the TCC regulator circuit, so additional diagnostic steps were in order. We discussed this with the customer, and he authorized the additional time. At this point I was fairly convinced that we were going to need to go inside the unit.

We always start our evaluation with some pretty basic steps: check fluid level and condition, scan for codes, perform a battery and charging system test, and an undercar inspection. At this point everything was looking good, fluid was full and clean, there were no DTCs for the engine or transmission, and the battery and charging system test results came back error-free, and there were no obvious problems shown with the visual inspection.

At this point we proceeded to take the vehicle out for a road test with the scan tool connected so that I could monitor the PIDS for the TCC command while looking at the TCC duty-cycle while the surge was occurring. It appeared that the PCM was commanding the change, although it was very erratic. Given this information, I now had to try to figure out what PCM inputs could be causing this to happen.

After a few considerations, I turned my attention to the TPS signal. Utilizing a Snap-On Verus Pro scan tool there is a PID called, “CALC TPS %” and while monitoring this value, I saw what was making the PCM vary the duty-cycle and therefore causing the TCC surge. There was a noticeable jump in the TPS signal when the surge was happening (Figure 1). As this is a “drive by wire” system, I also looked at the APP signal and it was smooth. Further testing was now in order.

After looking over the circuit wiring diagram and connector view from GM Service Information, and also checking for pertinent TSBs, I hooked up the scope right at the throttle body to TPS1 and TPS2. At a throttle position just a little off idle, I could see the glitch in the signal in both of the inputs (Figure 2). After verifying there were no ground issues I was leaning toward recommending that the throttle body be replaced. One last thing I needed to check was if there were any updates to the PCM calibration. Checking the current calibration against the GM TDS website, I noted that there were several updates to the calibration, although none of them relative toward the issue that I was having.

Figure 2

My recommendations for repair included a pan inspection & fluid/filter change, a replacement AC Delco throttle body, and reprogramming of the PCM. All repairs were authorized by the customer and we proceeded with the repair. After my recommended repairs, drivability was normal, data signals were smooth, and the TCC surge was gone. The vehicle was then returned to the customer. Another one done, or so I thought.

Unfortunately, two days after the vehicle was returned to the customer, he returned with the dreaded, “It’s still doing the same thing.” I grabbed the scan tool and went for a ride with him, and this time it took quite a while for him to get the vehicle to act up and it was not a repeated surge like it was before. However, under just the right set of circumstances you could see the tach rise up by about 50 RPM. This little RPM flare would only happen at very light loads. While I could see the duty-cycle command change when this happened (Figure 3), I could find no reason for why it happened as the TPS signal was smooth.

I then recorded all the transmission data so I could go back and look at it more in depth, to no avail. We again went for another road test while I was looking at the engine side of the data and happened to catch something changing when the RPM flare occurred. This particular vehicle has the “DOD System” (Displacement On Demand) where under light load conditions it can deactivate cylinders 1 and 7 on the left bank and cylinders 4 and 6 on the right bank at cruising speed. On the scan tool there is a PID called, “Cyl deact system command” that will either show V8 or V4 and this is where I saw the change: every time that the PCM commanded a change in state from either 8Cyl mode to 4Cyl mode or vice versa there was a quick dip in the TCC duty-cycle command (Figure 3).

It was more noticeable from V8 to V4 because of the light load, when going from V4 to V8 there was an increase in load that triggers the change in state and the small flare was not as noticeable. After verifying operation on another like vehicle, I have to conclude that this is a normal operation and just a byproduct of the change in state from V8 to V4 mode and probably programmed into the software to make sure the transition is smooth so the owners do not notice a bump or jerk during this transition. Since I am not a GM engineer, this last statement is just my opinion. I have never seen anything in print to 100% verify.

General Motors is an innovator of automatic transmissions, introducing the Hydra-Matic in 1940.[1] This list includes some GM transmissions.

2006 Chevy Impala Transmission Dipstick

Automatic transmissions[edit]

Impala

Early models[edit]

The GM Hydra-Matic was a success and installed in the majority of GM models by 1950. Through the 1950s, all makers were working on their own automatic transmission, with four more developed inside GM alone. All of GM's early automatic transmissions were replaced by variants of the Turbo-Hydramatic by the 1970s.

  • 1940–1967 Hydra-Matic — Oldsmobile (now the trade name for all GM automatic transmissions)
  • 1948–1963 Dynaflow — Buick
  • 1950–1973 Powerglide — Chevrolet (also used by Pontiac, Holden, Vauxhall and Opel)
  • 1968-1971 Torquedrive- Chevrolet ( Camaro and Chevy II, Nova. Manually shifted on Column. )
  • 1957–1961 Turboglide — Chevrolet (V8 models only, except Corvette)
  • 1958–1959 Flightpitch — Buick
  • 1961–1963 Dual Path Turbine Drive — Buick
  • 1961–1964 Roto Hydramatic — Oldsmobile/Pontiac (also used by Holden)
  • 1964–1969 Super Turbine 300 — Buick/Oldsmobile/Pontiac (Oldsmobile Jetaway)
  • 1968–1969 Torquedrive — Chevrolet (manually column shifted 2 speed automatic, 6 cyl only)
  • 1956-1964 4 speed Controlled coupling HydraMatic, also known as Cadillac 315 or P 315 HydraMatic, Oldsmobile Jetaway, Pontiac Super HydraMatic.
  • TempestTorque, ( Pontiac) a two speed based on Powerglide, but having the added feature of ' Split Torque ' dividing the engine power between mechanical connection and the torque converter in high gear.

Turbo-Hydramatic[edit]

The Turbo-Hydramatic was used by all GM divisions, and formed the basis for the company's modern Hydramatic line. The basic rear-wheel drive Turbo-Hydramatic spawned two front-wheel drive variants, the transverseTurbo-Hydramatic 125, and the longitudinalTurbo-Hydramatic 425. A third variant was the light-duty rear wheel drive Turbo-Hydramatic 180 used in many European models.

Heavy-duty rear wheel drive
  • 1971–1994 3L80HD (heavy duty version of TH400)
Medium-duty rear wheel drive
  • 1964–1992 Super Turbine 400/TH400/3L80
  • 1969–1986 TH350/TH350C/TH375B/TH250/TH250C
  • 1972–1976 TH375 — Light duty version of TH400
  • 1976–1987 TH200/TH200C
  • 1981–1990 TH200-4R
  • 1982–1993 TH700R4/4L60
Light-duty rear wheel drive
  • 1969–1998 TH180/TH180C/3L30 — 3-speed European/Asian model. Also manufactured and used by Holden as the Trimatic transmission.
Transverse front wheel drive
  • 1980–1999 TH125/TH125C/3T40 — 3-speed light-duty
  • 1984–1994 TH440-T4/4T60 — 4-speed medium-duty
Longitudinal front wheel drive
  • 1966–1978 TH425 — 3-speed
  • 1979–1981 TH325 — 3-speed
  • 1982–1985 TH325-4L — 4-speed

Electronic Hydra-Matics[edit]

The next-generation transmissions, introduced in the early 1990s, were the electronic Hydra-Matics based on the Turbo-Hydramatic design. Most early electronic transmissions use the '-E' designator to differentiate them from their non-electronic cousins, but this has been dropped on transmissions with no mechanical version like the new GM 6L80 transmission.

Today, GM uses a simple naming scheme for their transmissions, with the 'Hydra-Matic' name used on most automatics across all divisions.

3/4/5/6L/T##-Elll
Number of forward gearsL=Longitudinal
T=Transverse
GVWR rating'E' for Electronic
'HD' for Heavy Duty
First-generation longitudinal (Rear Wheel drive)
  • 1991–2001 4L30-E — 4-speed light-duty (used in BMW, Cadillac, Isuzu, and Opel cars)
  • 1992– 4L60-E/4L65-E — 4-speed medium-duty (used in GM trucks and rear-wheel-drive cars)
  • 1991– 4L80-E/4L85-E — 4-speed heavy-duty (used in GM trucks)
First-generation transverse (Front Wheel drive)
  • 1995–2010 4T40-E/4T45-E — 4-speed light-duty (used in smaller front wheel drive GM vehicles)
  • 1991–2010 4T60-E/4T65-E/4T65E-HD — 4-speed medium-duty (used in larger front wheel drive GM vehicles)
  • 1993–2010 4T80-E — 4-speed heavy-duty (used in large front wheel drive GM vehicles, only with Cadillac NorthStar V8.

2006 Chevy Impala Transmission Recalls

Second-generation longitudinal (Rear Wheel drive)
  • 2000–2007 5L40-E/5L50 — 5-speed medium-duty (used in Cadillac's Sigma vehicles)
  • 2007–present 6L45/6L50 — 6-speed medium-duty (used in GM Sigma platform cars)
  • 2006–present: 6L80/6L90 — 6-speed heavy-duty (used in GM trucks and performance cars)
  • 2014–present: 8L90 — 8-speed heavy-duty (used in GM trucks and performance cars)
  • 2016–present: 8L45 — 8-speed light-duty (used in GM luxury cars)
  • 2017–present: 10L80 - Ford-GM 10-speed automatic transmission (used in GM light trucks including pickups and related SUVs)
  • 2017–present: 10L90 - Ford-GM 10-speed automatic transmission (used in GM performance cars)

2006 Chevy Impala Transmission Fluid

*This transmission is part of a joint-venture between General Motors and Ford Motor Company to split development of two transmissions, a longitudinal 10-speed and transverse 9-speed. Ford led the design of the 10-speed transmission, as well as filing the design patents for said transmission. According to an official report by the SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers) the design of the 10-speed gearbox is essentially all Ford, while GM was responsible for designing the 9-speed 9T transverse automatic gearbox. As part of their joint-venture, Ford will let GM use the 10-speed transmission with rights to modify and manufacture it for their own applications. In-exchange for Ford's 10-speed transmission, General Motors will let Ford use its 9-speed transmission for front-wheel drive applications; Ford ultimately declined use of the 9T.[2][3][4]

Second-generation transverse (Front Wheel drive)
  • 2008–present: 6T30/6T40/6T45 — 6-speed light-duty
  • 2006–present: 6T70/6T75 — 6-speed medium-duty
  • 2016–present: 9T50/9T65 Hydra-Matic – 9-speed[5]
2006 Chevy Impala Transmission

Hybrid and PHEV[edit]

  • 2ML70 - 2-Mode Hybrid transmission.
  • 4ET50 (MKA) - Electric Drive Unit Transaxle (First Generation Chevrolet Volt / Cadillac ELR)
  • 5ET50 (MKV) - Electronically controlled, continuously-variable automatic transaxle (Second Generation Chevrolet Volt)[6]
  • 5ET50 (MKE) - Electronically controlled, continuously-variable automatic transaxle Transaxle (Full Hybrid, Ninth Generation Chevrolet Malibu)[7]
  • 4EL70 (MRD) - Electric Drive Unit Transmission (PHEV Cadillac CT6)

Other automatics[edit]

  • Aisin AF33 — 5-speed transverse automatic made by Aisin AW Co., Ltd.
  • Allison 1000 Series — 6-speed longitudinal automatic made by Allison Transmission
  • Saturn MP6/MP7 — 4-speed automatic developed by Saturn for use in the S-series from 1991 to 2002
  • VTi transmission — continuously variable transmission
  • Tremec M1L transmission — 8-speed Dual-Clutch made by Tremec for the Chevrolet Corvette C8
  • GM CVT250 — continuously variable transmission

Future[edit]

Manual transmissions[edit]

2006 chevy impala transmission mount

Longitudinal transmissions[edit]

  • Aisin AR5/MA5 — 5-speed longitudinal manual made by Aisin
  • Aisin AY6 — 6-speed longitudinal manual made by Aisin
  • Getrag 260 — 5-speed longitudinal manual made by Getrag
  • Muncie M20 — 4-speed longitudinal wide ratio manual transmission made by GM at their Muncie, Indiana factory
  • Muncie M21 — 4-speed longitudinal close ratio manual transmission made by GM at their Muncie, Indiana factory
  • Muncie M22 — 4-speed longitudinal heavy duty close ratio manual transmission made by GM at their Muncie, Indiana factory
  • Saginaw M26/27 transmission — 3 and 4-speed longitudinal light duty (less than 300 hp wide ratio manual transmission made by GM at their Saginaw, Michigan factory
  • Muncie M62/M64 — 3-speed longitudinal transmission made by GM
  • Muncie SM420 — 4-speed manual used up to 1967, very similar to sm 465 except small changes to gear ratios and location of reverse.
  • New Process Gear NP435 - 4-speed longitudinal transmission used in a select handful of 67-72 GM pickups
  • New Process Gear A833 RPO MY6 or MM7 — 4-speed longitudinal A833 overdrive transmission made by New Process Gear for early to mid 1980s General Motors Light Trucks
  • Muncie SM465 — 4-speed longitudinal manual used in 68- 91 Chevy 1/2 3/4 and 1 ton trucks
  • New Venture Gear NV1500 — 5-speed longitudinal manual made by New Venture Gear
  • New Venture Gear 3500/4500 — 5-speed longitudinal manual made by New Venture Gear
  • Borg-Warner T-10 transmission — 4-speed longitudinal manual currently made by Richmond Gear; originally made by Borg-Warner
  • Tremec T-5 — 5-speed longitudinal manual currently made by Tremec; originally made by Borg-Warner
  • Borg-Warner T-50 transmission — 5-speed longitudinal manual - used by GM in its H Body cars and a few other limited light duty applications from 1976 to 1978;
  • Tremec T-56 — 6-speed longitudinal manual overdrive made by Tremec; formerly made by Borg-Warner
  • Tremec TR-6060 — 6-speed longitudinal manual overdrive made by Tremec
  • ZF S6-650 — 6-speed longitudinal manual made by ZF Friedrichshafen
  • Tremec TR-6070 — 7-speed longitudinal manual overdrive made by Tremec

Transverse Transmissions[edit]

  • F23 — 5-speed transverse manual manufactured by Getrag
  • F35 — 5-speed transverse manual manufactured by Saab in Gothenburg, Sweden
  • F40 — 6-speed transverse manual manufactured by FGP Germany
  • Getrag 282 — 5-speed transverse manual designed by Getrag and manufactured by Muncie Getrag
  • Getrag 284 — 5-speed transverse manual designed by Getrag and manufactured by Muncie Getrag
  • MP2/MP3 — 5-speed manual developed by Saturn for use in the S-Series from 1991 to 2002

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^'Hydra-Matic History: The First Automatic Transmission'. Ate Up With Motor. 2010-05-29. Retrieved 2014-01-15.
  2. ^'Exclusive: An Inside Look At Ford's New 10 Speed Transmission'. http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/. Retrieved 2015-03-16.External link in publisher= (help)
  3. ^Brooke, Lindsay. 'Ford and GM finally consummate 9- and 10-speed joint development'. articles.sae. SAE International. Retrieved 20 March 2016.
  4. ^'Ford passes on GM's 9-speed automatic transmission'. Retrieved 2018-11-12.
  5. ^Panait, Mircea. 'GM Hydra-Matic 9T50 Transmission Confirmed for Chevrolet Cruze, Malibu, Equinox'. autoevolution. Retrieved 2016-12-07.
  6. ^'GM Service Insights, pg 23'(PDF). Archived from the original(PDF) on 2019-01-09. Retrieved 2019-07-16.
  7. ^'GM Service Insights, pg 23'(PDF). Archived from the original(PDF) on 2019-01-09. Retrieved 2019-07-16.
Retrieved from 'https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_GM_transmissions&oldid=999889435'